Welcome to the YoungWilliams Research & Case Law Library.  Use the filters below to select categories of interest to you.  Currently our Library consists of academic and government research articles and reports from around the country, federal opinions, and case law from states in which our full service child support projects are located: Colorado, Kansas, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wyoming.  Sign up to receive updates by clicking the blue  box at the left of the page.

Disclaimer:  YoungWilliams does not endorse the reports or opinions expressed by non-YoungWilliams authors, nor do we endorse the entities that initially released or published the materials posted on our website.

 

Research & Case Law

Independent Contractors and Nontraditional Workers: Implications for the Child Support Program

March 2019

An increasing number of parents are employed in non-traditional jobs where income withholding is not available. This article identifies issues for the child support program with the “gig economy.” The research yielded three key findings: the larger number of parents employed in this manner means less consistent child support payments, automated enforcement tools have limited use for collecting support, and outreach to the parents and the employers may be the most effective way of collecting support.

Child Support Compliance in Fatherhood Programs: The Role of Hope, Role Salience, and Parenting Skills

February 2019

This study evaluates the roles of hope, parenting role salience, and parenting skills in predicting change in a non-custodial parent’s compliance with child support. The authors surveyed participants in a responsible fatherhood program both prior to the start of the program and upon completion.

Wilkinson v. Wilkinson (Mississippi 2019)

February 2019

A prima facie case for contempt in a child support case is made once a parent entitled to support shows the other parent has not paid. Then, the burden of proof shifts to the paying parent to defend the nonpayment.

Breining-Pruitt v. Westfahl (Nebraska 2019)

February 2019

When calculating income for child support, a parent’s earning capacity can be used instead of their actual income. Earning capacity is determined from work history, education, occupational skills, and job opportunities.

Pruitt v. Pruitt (Tennessee 2019)

February 2019

In order for a judgment to be set aside under Rule 60.02, there must be a material mistake of fact.

Hall v. Hall (Nebraska 2019)

February 2019

A parent must provide specific evidence of income for child support but it can come from several sources. The mother filed a motion to modify custody and support. The district court denied the modification of custody and increased mother’s child support.

2Gen Procedures Integrating a two-Generation Approach to Child Support Services Colorado’s Service Level Approach

January 2019

In 2013, Child Support Services Division (CSS) of the Colorado Department of Human Services began an agency shift its philosophy of providing services. CSS wanted to provide services in a way that would benefit the entire family. 

Jones v. Jones (Mississippi 2019)

January 2019

A parent cannot be found in contempt for failure to pay support and found to have overpaid child support at the same time. The parties divorced in 2006, and while a wage withholding was entered, it was never issued.

State of Tennessee ex rel. Moore v. Oden (Tennessee 2019)

January 2019

If a judgment is missing from a record, it can be added later nunc pro tunc as long as the evidence supports that it was properly announced and not entered due to a clerical error. The parents in this case were never married and had one child.

Beck v. Beck (Nebraska 2019)

January 2019

To modify a child support order, a parent must show a substantial change of circumstances which occurred after entry of the most recent order and wasn’t contemplated when the order was entered. A change is a parent’s financial situation can qualify.

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